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Kirklees’ Muslim Community needs to reassess its leadership…

In Huddersfield the Kirklees’ Muslim Action Committee, claiming to represent 15,000 Muslims, is deeply upset at a Muslim group that held an Exhibition on the Holy Qur’ān (see Newspaper report HERE).

Surprisingly, the spokesman of the Action Committee, Mr. Amar Usman Ali, is reported to have said:

“We believe that it is time the Muslims of Huddersfield did not allow a local group to use our name to hold any future exhibitions, and have been hurt and deeply upset over the lack of consultation with the Muslim community prior to holding this event.”

The Qur’ān Exhibition held in Huddersfield Town Hall was attendede by the Mayor of Kirklees and a Member of Parliament.  Notably, Mr. Ali’s statement seems highly irrelevant and shows an immense lack of maturity… Read the rest of this entry »
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Islam in LondonIn the aftermath of the media-frenzy over the comments made by the Archbishop of Canterbury about the possible inclusion of certain aspect of the Shari’ah or the Islamic Law into English Law, it was observed by many commentators and academics that the media had, for the most of it, been totally ignorant of the concept, definition, remit and application of the Shari’ah.

There is much information on this topic from both reliable and non-reliable sources. 
See here for a good basic introduction of the Shari’ah and its essential sources that constitute it, aswell as a brief introduction as to the application of the Shari’ah and what it is designed to achieve.
 (If the link does not work, you can download the article directly here: The Shari’ah – an introductory glimpse into the divinely ordained path)
For other interesting articles, also see:
http://www.alislam.org/whats-new.html
http://www.alislam.org/library/articles/

 In an article on the TimesOnline Website, Ian Edge and Robin Griffiths-Jones ask the question as to whether Islamic Law and English Law can ever meet, and if so, would English Law be able to accommodate the ‘extravagancies’ of the former!!

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